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4 steps to get executive management use your enterprise social network

In a previous blog post I looked at WHY and HOW managers, especially executive managers, could and should use their company’s enterprise social network or social intranet. In this post I describe WHAT they can do to quickly get started.

Quick recap from the previous post. Not only the technology to interact with employees changes, but more importantly certain character traits need to exist or to be learned. To become better managers, managers need to be

    1. Visible
    2. Authentic
    3. Human
    4. Valuable
    5. Compassionate.

To make things easy I will refer to enterprise social network and social intranet platforms in generic terms. Some of them may not have the features mentioned below. Some of them, for example IBM Connections, Jive, Yammer, Socialcast, Communote, Chatter and many others, might have, including other relevant features.

If you have 30 min with an executive manager, here is what I would do after having explained the WHY and HOW:

1) Fill in your profile

Every employee should have a profile on platform, which is visible to the entire company. In some cases information is pulled from the Active Directory. In most cases this information is incomplete though. A photo, About Me, Experience and other profile fields are probably missing. Depending on the platform policy the picture may not need to be a formal corporate photo. Remember being authentic and human!

About Me section: Of course, some formal words about the manager, his role but it’s also important to include something interesting that maybe few people knew.

2) Get the app on mobile

Especially managers and executives are often in meetings or on the road. Having easy access to the platform through mobile devices lowers the barrier to participation. Thus, help the manager to download the app or provide other means of mobile access to the platform. In some cases, the app can be pushed to the device beforehand.

3) Microblogging

Once this is done you can start with using the microblogging part. If you have only 30 min, I would focus on this. Few executives will immediately join communities, collaboratively work on documents or want to start a blog. Microblogging is something quick and easy to pick up and can already provide a lot of value.

When it comes to the microblogging part it is important to remember the principles of this new way of communicating a – build trust by being visible, authentic, human, valuable and compassionate. To make the microblogging part more tangible for your executive, explain that it is similar to working out loud, i.e. working out loud in public but within the company, of course.

Quick starting points when thinking about what to post:

  • Share what’s on your mind
    • Collaboration can start with just four words: ‘what do you think …’, ‘anyone heard of this …’
  • Share what you are doing
    • ‘I was just interviewed by Bloomberg. We talked about …’, ’Here is an interesting article I recently read. Wondering if we are doing anything in this area already…’ or ‘what do you think about…’
  • Share something personal
    • ‘I went to see the Red Sox game on the weekend. Great atmosphere…’ or ‘I just finished reading War & Peace. It took a while, but glad I read it till the end.’
  • Share to care/give praise: 
    • ‘Thank you <employee> / <team> for your contribution…’ or even just by simply liking a status update or comment by other people! This takes about 5 min of your executive’s day but can be invaluable and motivating to his employees.
    • If the executive feels more comfortable, he can also give praise in private channels in the beginning. Even this will show employees that he is actually aware of what is going on in the company.

When talking about microblogging you should also introduce @mentions and #hashtags. @mentions are relevant because you can ‘tag’ people in a post. That means if they are mentioned they will receive a notification. #hashtags are another way of disseminating information on the platform. People can subscribe to #hashtags. Maybe there is a particular hashtag that is relevant for your executive or he would like to introduce, e.g. ‘innovation’ or some campaign he is responsible for. When you click on a #hashtag people will be able to see all posts to the microblog that have been tagged with the #hashtag.

Point out to your executive that he does not need to check the microblogging stream every 10 minutes. Important information and discussions will flow to the top.

What to avoid

    • Purely promotional posts.
    • Too formal updates. Being authentic and human is key.
    • Posts by others than the executive
    • Useless or frequent posts with same content. Just writing ‘I am meeting person x today’ every day becomes boring over time. More context and variety should be given.
    • Lengthy updates
    • Giving up. In the beginning people might be hesitant to interact, especially if they don’t know the executive personally. Some are probably shocked by the fact he is actually reading people’s updates and even responding. That is scary and people need to get used to it. One way of breaking the ice is by being proactive – asking questions and going out to where the people are having conversations.
4) Follow relevant people

Obviously, your executive should start following all other executives and maybe their reports. Also, he should follow people from his team, people he worked with at the company etc. Explain why he should follow other people and what impact that has on his interaction with the platform.

Whilst the above already provides concrete, practical steps to get executives into using your enterprise social network or social intranet by working out loud, you will still need to tweak the messages and steps for your managers. There is lots more that can be done (e.g. particular use cases for executive management) or said depending on the experience, behaviours, requirements of the managers.

If your executive needs some more inspiration and convincing, you may want to show him this video of Giam Swiegers, CEO Deloitte Australia talking about his own use of the company’s enterprise social network based on Yammer.

This post is part of the blog parade of the Social Business Arena. Check out other blog posts that deal with the adoption of social tools in the workplace.

5 thoughts on “4 steps to get executive management use your enterprise social network”

  1. I believe there must be some kind of error in this sentence:
    “Some of them, for example IBM Connections, Jive, Yammer, Socialcast, Communote, Chatter and many others) may not have the features mentioned below. Some of them might have, including other relevant features.”
    To my knowledge both Yammer and Jive have the features mentioned in your post… Is your phrase mixed up? Wouldn’t that be
    “Some of them may not have the features mentioned below. Some of them, for example IBM Connections, Jive, Yammer, Socialcast, Communote, Chatter and many others, might have, including other relevant features.”

    1. Thanks for stopping by, reading and commenting! I know I can follow hashtags in SharePoint and Yammer, but I am not sure I can do so in Jive, Socialcast, Chatter or other platforms not explicitely mentioned. Furthermore, I know all of the platforms explicitely mentioned provide AD integration but some companies may not have done so (especially small companies or companies just exploring the tools), which is why I put that caveat that not all the platforms or implementations may have the functionality outlined in the 4 steps. But I can see why the sentence is confusing, starting off with a negative statement. I like your suggestion and have incorporated it in the blog post. Thanks for pointing it out!

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